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State Doc Pick of the Week : The Steward

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The Steward is the official newsletter of the North Carolina Division of Parks and Recreation. The newsletter “has served as the historical record of the programs and growth of the state parks system” for more than 25 years.

You can find many articles and pictures pertaining to the North Carolina State Parks system. The articles cover things like where the N.C. State Parks are being featured, information about related documentaries,  growth of specific parks, events, state park campaigns, grants for state parks, and anything else that is deemed noteworthy by the N.C. State Parks to be included.

You can view, download, print, and save this newsletter here.

Celebrating African American History Month: New NCpedia biographies

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Celebrating African American History Month: new NCpedia biographies

 February is African American History Month and this year’s theme for the national observance is “Hallowed Grounds: Sites of African American Memories”.

Photo of Willie Otey (Willie Kay), ca. 1910, by Manly W. Tyree. Copy courtesy of Ralph Campbell, Jr. Item N_93_9_66, collection of the State Archives of North Carolina.

Photo of Willie Otey (Willie Kay), ca. 1910, by Manly W. Tyree. Copy courtesy of Ralph Campbell, Jr. Item N_93_9_66, collection of the State Archives of North Carolina.

This week NCpedia added two new resources that share two memories for African American history in North Carolina.  These stories are available thanks to collaboration with North Carolina curators and librarians.

Willie Otey Kay:  The first is a biographical essay on Willie Otey Kay — Raleigh dressmaker par excellence — written with Diana Bell-Kite, a curator at the North Carolina Museum of History who developed a new exhibit at the Museum, “Made Especially for You by Willie Kay”. If you haven’t visited the exhibit, do! It’s a wonderful window into the life and art of an amazing woman whose work transcended racially segregated society in Raleigh during the 20th century. Her life, work and legacy were featured in numerous publications, including McCall’s, Life, and the News & Observer. That legacy included both her enduring creations as well her descendents’ impact in the push for civil rights both locally in Raleigh and beyond.  The NCpedia article also includes images shared by the Museum of History and the State Archives of North Carolina.

 

Dr. C. B. Smith (left) and J.W. Mitchell, at the Negro 4-H Short Course at A & T College, Greensboro. From the "Annual Report of Agricultural Extension Work in North Carolina 1938." NCSU Libraries’ Digital Collections: Rare and Unique Materials.

Dr. C. B. Smith (left) and J.W. Mitchell, at the Negro 4-H Short Course at A & T College, Greensboro. From the “Annual Report of Agricultural Extension Work in North Carolina 1938.” NCSU Libraries’ Digital Collections: Rare and Unique Materials.

John W. Mitchell:  The second entry shares the life and work of John W. Mitchell, a “pioneering African American extension agent and educator who became one of the most well known Cooperative Extension agents in the nation.” Mitchell came to the state’s cooperative extension service in 1922 and became the head of the district office at A&T State University in an era when 4-H clubs and extension services were segregated, along with many aspects of life and opportunties for African Americans. He later went on to the U.S. Agricultural Extension Service and became one of the nation’s top agricultural experts.

This biography was contributed to NCpedia by James Stewart, a digital projects librarian at NC State University.  James works on projects in the “Better Living” collection at NCSU Libraries.  This is the first contribution to NCpedia from a new collaboration with NCSU Libraries!!

 

Kelly Agan, North Carolina Government & Heritage Library

 

How to find the parents of Orphans, Part 2

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In Part 1, I gave some basic information on how to find the parents of orphans and used fictitious examples. Today, I want to illustrate with original apprentice bonds that are all filed in the State Archives of North Carolina. I’ve previously talked a lot about these records, but not in a lot of detail.

For the past few weeks, I’ve been looking at books in our collection on apprentices and going to the archives for the original record. I’ve found some interesting things. One thing is very important to remember: what you find in one county may be very different than in another. This post will use Granville and Guilford Counties, which will help illustrate this difference.”

In the Government & Heritage Library genealogy collection for Guilford County, we have a published index of apprentice bonds that has been very helpful. Most of the pages are full of orphans, one after the other! For Granville County, we do not have such a book, but I remember from personal research that parents are often named in either the bond or the in the corresponding court record. The trick was finding one for comparison. (more…)

State Doc Pick of the Week : Choosing and Using Edible Flowers

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Cyndi Lauderdale and Lucy Bradley of the Department of Horticultural Science at North Carolina State 233593University have prepared a document published by the North Carolina Cooperative Extension Service, titled, Choosing and Using Edible Flowers: Enjoy the Flavor, Color, and Texture That Flowers Can Bring to Food.

This is a very interesting publication that talks about how to choose flowers that can add favorable taste, color, and fragrance to your dishes. The document is very thorough and talks very specifically about the different types of edible flowers as well as what flowers to avoid. Safety is of course a very big concern when it comes to eating plants and the document does a great job at emphasizing safety when choosing edible plants to add to your food.

Some other things you can find out about in this document: growing edible flowers, using edible flowers, harvesting flowers, preserving edible flowers, a thorough table list of edible flowers, and further readings to learn more about edible flowers and cooking with them.

You can view, download, print, and save this document here.

This blog is a service of the State Library of North Carolina, part of the NC Department of Cultural Resources. Blog comments and posts may be subject to Public Records Law and may be disclosed to third parties.